FANDOM


18XX games are a group of train games which recreate the building of railroad corporations during the 19th century. Other games which use similar mechanics are also included in this category. (Many titles are out-of-print and difficult to find.)

Main article: 18xx

1800 Edit

Colorado, published 2002 by David Methany in Rail Gamer #17, designed by Antonio Leal

1824 Edit

1824 was published by Double-O Games in 2005. The game was designed by Lonny Orgler and Helmut Ohley, and is set in Austria-Hungary. It is a smaller and simpler version of Lonny's 1837, and adds some ideas from his later 1854 and Helmut's 1844.

1825 Edit

Great Britain, released 1995 (Unit 1) by Hartland Trefoil, 2000 (Unit 2) and 2004 (Unit 3) by Tresham Games, designed by Francis Tresham.

1826 Edit

1826 was published by Chris Lawson in 2000 and Deep Thought Games in 2004[1] and set in France and Belgium. As David Hecht's first design, it is the most conventional, and only one to use "traditional" green and brown plain track upgrade tiles. 1826 started out as "1830 on a different map", but rapidly evolved into a game of capital and technology management: the game's key decisions revolve around when to "grow" a company, and which trains to buy to optimize a company's final position.

1829 MainlineEdit

England, released 2005 by Tresham Games, designed by Francis Tresham.

1829 (South) and 1829 (North) Edit

Main article: 1829 (board game)

1829 (South) was the first game in the 18XX series, published by Hartland Trefoil Ltd (UK) in 1974 from an original design by Francis Tresham. An second version, 1829 (North) was published in 1981.

1830 Edit

Main article: 1830: The Game of Railroads and Robber Barons

1830 was published by Avalon Hill in 1986, and its popularity led to the creation of many other 18XX games.

1832 Edit

1832 was published by Deep Thought Games in 2006.[1] The game was designed by Bill Dixon and is set in the Southeastern United States. It retains the new rules Bill introduced in 1850 and 1870 for share price protection, stock redeeming, and reiussing, while adding new rules to model the mergers that shaped the South's railroads.

1835 Edit

1835 was designed and published by Hans im Glück in 1990 and distributed in the United States by Mayfair Games.[2] The game board covers most of Germany. It was the first 18XX game use the concept of 'minor' companies, which operated like the normal stock companies (with some limitations) but are owned by a single person like a private company.

1837 Edit

Austria-Hungary, released and designed 1994 by Lonny Orgler

1837SX Edit

Saxony, self-published in 2003 by Wolfram Janich

1838 Edit

Rheinland, self-published in 2001 by Wolfram Janich

1839 Edit

Netherlands, self-published in 1993 by Paul Stouthard and Rob van Wijngaarden

1841 Edit

1841 was published by Chris Lawson in 1996. The game was designed by Federico Vellani with assistance from Manlio Manzini and is set in Italy. With its complicated financial rules and very steep train gradient (i.e., the trains get very expensive very quickly), it emphasizes stock manipulation and funding train purchases over route building.

1842 Edit

Hamburg/Schleswig-Holstein, self-published in 1995 by Wolfram Janich

1844 Edit

1844 was designed and published by Helmut Ohley in 2003. Peter Minder collected extensive background material and drew the map.

1846 Edit

1846 was published by Deep Thought Games in 2005.[1] The game was designed by Thomas Lehmann and is set in the Mid-western United States. It features a linear stock market (like 1829), n/m trains (which count n cities but may run through m total cities) and a simplified private company distribution. Another unusual feature is that the number of corporations, private companies, and the bank size all scale with the number of players, and the resulting game is shorter than most 18XX games.

1847 Edit

Germany-Pfalz, self-published in 1996 by Wolfram Janich

1849 Edit

Sicily, released 1998 by Chris Lawson, designed by Federico Vellani

1850 Edit

1850 was published by Deep Thought Games in 2006.[1] The game was designed by Bill Dixon and is set in the Mid-western United States. It retains the rules Bill introduced in 1870 for share price protection and stock redeeming/reissuing.

1851 Edit

Tennessee, released 1998 by Chris Lawson, designed by Mark Derrick and Chris Lawson

1853 Edit

India, released 1989 by Hartland Trefoil, designed by Francis Tresham

1854 Edit

1854 was published by both Lonny Orgler in 2002 and Deep Thought Games in 2005.[1] The game was designed by Lonny Orgler and is set in Austria. It features a hexagonal stock market, local railways which operate on a smaller map (which takes place on two hexes of the large map), mail contracts, 150% capitalization, and player share options. There are also tunnels which allow you to build under other track and terrain features, such as avoiding small cities. The local railways eventually grow up to be regional railroads operating on the main map, and the tradeoff between getting good revenues on the local map versus getting locked out of important locations on the main map is an important decision to make.

1856 Edit

1856 was published by Mayfair Games.[3] The game is set in Upper Canada, including the upper reaches of the St. Lawrence River, and the Toronto to Detroit area for southern Ontario.

1860 Edit

Isle of Wight, released 2004 by JKLM Games, designed by Mike Hutton

1861 Edit

Russia, released by JKLM Games and Lookout Games, designed by Ian D. Wilson

1862 Edit

1862 was designed and published by Helmut Ohley in 2002. The game covers the entire width of the United States and parts of Canada.

1870 Edit

Mississippi Valley, United States, released 1995, designed by Bill Dixon and published by Mayfair Games[4]

1889 Edit

1889 was published by both Wild Heaven Productions in 2004 and Deep Thought Games in 2006.[1] The game was designed by Yasutaka Ikeda and is set in Shikoku, Japan. The rules for 1889 are essentially the same as 1830, except on a much smaller and terrain-heavy map and different privates. The goal is to make a quick and relatively simple game which explores the history of railroads on Shikoku.

1890 Edit

Osaka Japan, released 1999 by Nobuhiro Izumi, designed by Shin-ichi Takasaki

1895 Edit

Namibia, released 2005, designed by Helmut Ohley and Adam Romoth

1898 Edit

France, self-published in 1999 by Michael Brünker

1899 Edit

China and Korea, released by Chris Lawson, designed by Dirk Clemens and Ingo Meyer

18AL Edit

18AL was self-published by Mark Derrick in 1999 and later by John David Galt. It is set in the Alabama, United States and aims to provide a quicker and simpler introduction to the 18XX series.

18C2C Edit

18C2C was published by Designs in Creative Entertainment in 2003. The game was designed by Mark Frazier and covers the entire United States and Southern Canada. This is an extremely large game that attempts to model the entire history of railroading in the United States, and accordingly takes a long time to play. It consists of a 38"x68" map, 34 public companies, 18 private companies, and 108 trains.

18EU Edit

18EU was published by Deep Thought Games in 2004.[1] The game was designed by David G.D. Hecht, and is set in the heart of Europe, reaching from Paris and London to Rome, Budapest and Warsaw. 18EU is a compact game, played on four map panels. Unlike most 18XX games, there are no private companies, and share companies may only be started indirectly. When the game starts, fifteen minor companies (similar to the "forerunner" companies in 1835, 1837 and 1824) are auctioned off. These companies represent regional or private-sector rail companies. There are eight possible share companies, and at least one minor company must be merged into a share company to form it.[5]

18FL Edit

18FL was published by Deep Thought Games in 2006.[1] The game was designed by David G.D. Hecht and is set in Florida, United States. It is very similar to Mark Derrick's 18AL and 18GA in that it is a simple game intended as an introduction to the 18XX game system for new players. Unlike 18AL or 18GA, the "ultimate" train is a 6 (or a 3E) train. This means that 4 trains never become obsolete, and the greatest difficulty in a small game (and the greatest deterrent for new players), a massive "train rush" when permanent trains are first available, is substantially mitigated.

18GA Edit

18GA was self-published by Mark Derrick in 1998 and later by John David Galt. It is set in the Georgia, United States and aims to provide a quicker and simpler introduction to the 18XX series.

18GL Edit

18GL was published by Deep Thought Games in 2006.[1] The game was designed by Gary Mroczka and is set in the Great Lakes area, United States. It uses basically the same rules as David G.D. Hecht's 1826 (specifically, H-trains, loans, trainless companies get merged into a government railroad) except that there are no destinations, there is only one merger, and instead of TGV trains there are Diesel trains. The map is quite different, and the private companies have the effect of altering how the map develops depending on the combinations of private companies and corporations particular players get.

18HeXX Edit

Variable-geometry board, self-published in 2000 by Mike Schneider

18KAASEdit

Netherlands, self-published in 1992 by Erno Eekelschot

18MEX Edit

18MEX was published by Deep Thought Games in 2005.[1] The game was designed by Mark Derrick and is set in Mexico. It features a government railroad that optionally absorbs only one company (with additional limits on which companies may merge into it), so it can be dangerous to plan on being able to get rid of a trainless company through merger. Like most of Mark's games, dot-towns don't count against trains, so part of the strategy is arranging to pick up as many of them as possible while still getting through important cities. In addition, there are three minor companies which operate under restricted rules in the early game.

18MEX has one of the fiercest train rushes of all the 18xx games, second only to 1841. The action start when the first 4-train is bought. This has several effects to the game. One of it is that it effectively rusts all the 2-trains. Another is the one train per turn limit is lifted, so corporations may buy as many trains as their funds and corporate charters permit on each subsequent operating round. However the real action starts when the second of the two 5-trains is bought. The next set trains is a pair of 6-trains. The first 6-train rusts all the 3-trains in play, while the second 6-train will obsolete all the 4-trains in play. The price of the next set of trains (4D-trains) is set at 700 pesos.

This fierce train rush coupled with the extremely high track building cost (98% of the board is covered in difficult terrain and some track upgrades requires money as well) will see almost half of the corporations in play unable to buy the next train when their trains become rusted at an alarming rate.

Also, there are only 11 permanent trains available but there are 8 corporations. All corporations have a train limit of 2 except for NdM which has a train limit of 3. This means that some corporations will most likely end up without any trains to operate.

18NL Edit

Netherlands, self-published in 2005 by Wolfram Janich.

18Scan Edit

18Scan was published by Deep Thought Games in 2005.[1] The game is one of the smaller 18XX titles, and was designed by David G.D. Hecht in order to introduce gamers to some of the more "exotic" systems used in other designs. 18Scan includes 1835-style minor companies, an 1835-style merger corporation, 1870-style destination rules (for the minor companies), 1856-style company flotation rules, and market-priced incremental capitalization rules as in 1851 and 1826.

18TN Edit

18TN was published by Deep Thought Games in 2006.[1] The game was designed by Mark Derrick originally in 1996, and upon discussions with Chris Lawson it was modified and published by Chris as 1851 in 1998. The two games were sufficiently different to warrant the publication of the original.

18US Edit

18US was published in 2006 by Deep Thought Games.[1] The game, designed by David G.D. Hecht as an "advanced" 18XX game, is set in the continental United States. Unlike 18C2C or other, similar products, it is a very compact game: the entire "Lower 48" only takes up two map panels.

18VA Edit

18VA was published by Deep Thought Games in 2005.[1] The game, designed by David G.D. Hecht, is a smaller 18xx game, originally intended to be similar in scope to Mark Derrick's "one-state" games 18AL and 18GA. Set in Virginia and Maryland, it is slightly more complex than either of the above.

18West Edit

18West was published in 2007 by Deep Thought Games.[1] The game, designed by David G.D. Hecht, is set in the western United States. Many of the mechanics are quite different from other 18XX games.

2038 Edit

2038 has the game mechanics of an 18XX railroad game, but with an asteroid mining theme. Its mechanics are fairly close to those of 1835, including a set of minor companies and a big merger company. Specific features are changes in the values of mines (the equivalent of cities), a small fee for companies which explore asteroïds (the equivalent of laying a tile, but needs a spaceship/train)and two different ways of starting companies (direct start with full monetary assets, or "growth companies", that sart quicker but with smaller assets).

Poseidon Edit

Aegean Sea, designed by Helmut Ohley and Leonhard "Lonny" Orgler, and drawn by Klemens Franz, and published through Lookout Games and Z-Man Games, is a shorter (two hours) variant 18xx game set in ancient Greece with shipping lines instead of railroads.[1]

Ur 1830BC Edit

Ur 1830BC is loosely adapted from the 18XX series, and features irrigation and kingdom management in ancient Mesopotamia. It was designed by Jeroen Doumen and Joris Wiersinga and published by Splotter Spellen. As with all games in the 18XX series, play centers around ownership of valuable networks. Ur 1830BC replaces the rail networks found in most 18XX games with networks of irrigation canals, shares with parcels of land, companies with kingdoms, trains with irrigation technologies (such as reservoirs and pumps), and company presidents with kings. While typical 18XX games rail networks generate income through the operation of trains; in Ur 1830BC networks of canals and waterworks generate income by irrigating lands within kingdoms.

ReferencesEdit

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.